grandchildren

Do I Need to Amend My Will or Trust?

Do I Need to Amend My Will or Trust?

When I was a kid, I really wanted a remote-controlled hovercraft.

I thought it looks awesome. I mean, just the idea of a flying remote-controlled car was amazing. So I saved up my money and bought one. Can you guess what happened next?

If you said, “I used it a few times and then never touched it again,” then you would be correct. The thing took like 37 hours to charge and you could only use it for two minutes until you had to charge it again.

I was really upset about it at the time. I kept thinking, “If only I could exchange this toy for another!” Unfortunately for me, Toys “R” Us hates children and refused to give me my money back. And that’s why I became a lawyer. For justice.

Here’s the good news: there is no Toy “R” Us return policy for your estate planning documents. You can update them, change, exchange, or revoke them entirely as long as you are alive and competent (with a few exceptions).

When should I amend my Will or Trust?

Some attorneys may try to convince you that your Will or Trust needs to be amended whenever you go through any significant life change. Buy a new house? Amend your Trust. Have a grandchild? Amend your Will. Finish binge watching Friends? Amend, amend, amend.

9 Signs It's Time to Update Your Estate Plan

9 Signs It's Time to Update Your Estate Plan

You finally took the plunge and created an estate plan. Wonderful. Awesome. High five. But now that you have a plan, how often do you need to revisit or update it?

Rather than updating your estate plan every X number of years, we recommend revisiting and (potentially) revising it whenever you experience a significant life change. A will or trust you signed years ago might no longer reflect what you care about.

Consider reviewing and/or updating your estate plan if you have experienced any of these changes:

Use RMDs to Fund a 529 Account

Use RMDs to Fund a 529 Account

A 529 account (or 529 plan) is a tax-advantaged savings plan designed to encourage saving for future college costs. The different types and mechanics of 529 plans are best saved for another blog post. For now, the important thing to know is that there are three main benefits to using your RMDs to fund a 529 plan:

1. Earnings grow tax-free.

Usually, you have to pay income taxes on RMDs. If you then invest the RMD, you will likely pay a second round of taxes on those earnings down the road. On the other hand, if you contribute your RMD to a grandchild's 529 account, you will still pay income tax on the RMD, but the money you invest in the 529 account will grow tax-deferred. And if the money is later used for qualified education expenses, the entire amount is available tax-free.