living will

Estate Planning for Young Professionals

Estate Planning for Young Professionals

If you are a young professional, estate planning is probably not even on your radar.

And why on earth should you have to think about it?

You’re young.

You don’t have many assets.

You’re single (and your grandma keeps reminding you about it).

Your family knows what you want.

You have other things to worry about.

You’re going to live forever.

However, estate planning is just as important (if not more important) for single young professionals as for older, wealthier, married-ier individuals.

But how do you create an estate plan? Where should you start? It’s a big question. Lucky for you, we have already done the heavy lifting. Here are 4 quick estate planning tips for young professionals:

1. Get a Durable Power of Attorney

In short, a Durable Power of Attorney is an estate planning document that gives someone (your “Attorney-in-Fact”) the ability to act for you in certain financial and/or medical situations.

“Why is this useful?” you may be yell-asking at your computer screen. And that’s a great question.

11 Estate Planning New Year's Resolutions

11 Estate Planning New Year's Resolutions

There’s nothing quite like the new year to make you think of fresh possibilities and new beginnings.

There’s also nothing quite like way too much turkey, wine, and football over the holidays to make you realize that you should maybe consider some lifestyle changes.

You have probably already started on your list of new year’s resolutions for 2019: read more, get a gym membership (and actually use it this time), spend more time with family, etc. And those are great resolutions. “New year, new me” and all that jazz.

But there is one more goal you should add to your list: organize your estate plan.

While most resolutions are about helping your self, an estate plan is about helping your loved ones. To make it easier for you to set your affairs in order, we created this handy list of 11 Estate Planning Resolutions for 2019:

1. Execute a Trust and/or a Will

You, like a majority of Americans, may not have a living trust or a last will and testament. You may not even know what those documents are. Which one is better? Which one is right for you? What are the differences between a will and a trust?

Both a trust and a will control what happens to your estate — your property, your “stuff” — after your death. However, there is one huge difference between the two: a trust avoids probate, while a will does not.

Yes, even if you have a will, your estate must still go through probate after your death.

Remember that there are two main sides to estate planning: (1) What happens to your “stuff” when you die and (2) who takes care of your self when you become incapacitated. You can solve the first part of that equation in 2019 by creating a trust or a will.

What's the Difference Between a Will and a Living Will?

What's the Difference Between a Will and a Living Will?

Estate planning can get confusing. We attorneys use crazy words like testator, corpus, inter vivos, and per stirpes. That's right: some of our terms are so weird, we have to italicize them.

Things get even more confusing when one estate planning term sounds just like another. So it's not surprising whenever our clients ask whether a Last Will and Testament and a Living Will are the same thing (or are at least similar).

The short answer: They are not the same thing. Not even close.

Before we dive in to the distinctions, here is a summary of what we will cover in this post:

You can click the links above to skip to that particular section, or just scroll down the page a bit. It's not a long article.

Anthony Bourdain and Estate Plans for Separated Spouses

Anthony Bourdain and Estate Plans for Separated Spouses

In the wake of celebrity chef and TV personality Anthony Bourdain's tragic death last week, many articles have been written about his complicated family situation, specifically that Bourdain and wife were permanently separated (but not divorced) at the time of his death.

Like death, divorce and separation are topics nobody likes to talk about. However, they have very different effects on an estate plan. In Anthony Bourdain's case, that leaves a host of estate planning issues unresolved — and millions of dollars up for grabs.

This blog post will discuss the impact of divorce and separation on estate planning, focusing on the following topics:

What is the difference between divorce and legal separation?

Why choose legal separation over divorce?

Can a spouse still inherit after a legal separation?

How can I protect my estate from a separation?

What is Estate Planning?

What is Estate Planning?

Most people have been told that they need an estate plan, but what exactly IS estate planning? What does it mean to have an estate plan, and why is it important to have one? Although estate planning is a very broad subject, it can be boiled down to this: An estate plan helps ensure that the proper people can take care of your SELF in the event of your incapacity and that the proper people get your STUFF in the event of your death. An estate plan includes several key aspects:

1. Formal documents

You have most likely heard of two very common estate-planning documents: a Last Will and Testament and a Living Trust. These documents say what happens to your STUFF after you die. Importantly, a Will is still subject to probate after your death; however, a properly funded Trust can avoid probate.

The Definitive Guide to Advance Directives

The Definitive Guide to Advance Directives

An advance directive for health care is a legal document that allows you to express your wishes for end-of-life care in the event you are unable to communicate those wishes to your doctor. In Oklahoma, an advance directive covers three topics: (1) the living will, (2) the health care proxy, and (3) anatomical gifts.

Part One: The Living Will

The main portion of an advance directive is the “living will,” by which you state your preference for the use of certain treatments under certain conditions. This is the most technical part of the document, so it is important to understand what these terms mean.