heirs

What is "funding" my trust and how do I do it?

What is "funding" my trust and how do I do it?

So you’ve created a living trust. Awesome. You are super responsible. Spectacular. Your estate is so planned. Excellent.

Reveling in your excellence, you may be thinking to yourself, “You did a great job, Self. You are so responsible, and your estate plan (which is very much planned) is good to go!”

But guess what? Yourself would be wrong.

Is my trust useless?

When you sign a trust document, you just have some sheets of paper. It may be fancy paper — and it’s definitely expensive paper — but it’s still just paper. And paper alone (usually) does not avoid probate. In other words: By itself, a signed trust can be pretty useless.

Think of a trust like a box. When you sign the trust, you have an empty box. To avoid probate, you want to fill that box with all your “stuff,” your assets. Anything that’s in the box at your death doesn’t have to go through probate. Anything that’s not in the box at your death does.

Do I need to pay inheritance taxes?

Do I need to pay inheritance taxes?

Do you want to pay less in taxes?

Of course you do. I would be worried if you wanted to pay more in taxes...

The question is HOW you can pay less in taxes. Here's one way: estate planning.

A good estate plan can help you minimize your tax burden. Specifically, estate planning can impact (1) income taxes, (2) inheritance taxes, and (3) estate taxes.

Most people are familiar with income taxes. However, they are less familiar with estate taxes; and many people have no idea that inheritance taxes even exist. So it comes as no surprise that one of the most common questions I get from prospective clients is:

"Do I need to pay inheritance taxes?"

It is a good question and is usually accompanied by a number of other, related questions:

  • What, exactly, is an inheritance tax?

  • Is an inheritance tax the same thing as an estate tax?

  • How can I avoid having to pay an inheritance tax?

This blog post will answer these questions, give you a better understanding of the difference between inheritance taxes and estate taxes, and explain how those laws operate in Oklahoma.