inheritance

IRS Raises Estate and Gift Tax Limits for 2019

IRS Raises Estate and Gift Tax Limits for 2019

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently announced that the estate and gift tax exemption is increasing next year: up from $11.18 million per individual in 2018 to $11.4 million in 2019.

This means that if an individual dies in 2019, she can leave $11.4 million to heirs and pay no federal estate tax. Using a concept called estate tax portability, a married couple can shield double that amount, $22.8 million, from estate taxes.

The IRS also confirmed that the annual gift exclusion amount for 2019 remains at $15,000 per individual per year, unchanged from 2018. This means you can give $15,000 to as many people you want (me, for instance) each year without filing a gift tax return.

Now that we have these big announcements out of the way, let’s unpack what all this fun information actually means.

Do I need to pay inheritance taxes?

Do I need to pay inheritance taxes?

Do you want to pay less in taxes?

Of course you do. I would be worried if you wanted to pay more in taxes...

The question is HOW you can pay less in taxes. Here's one way: estate planning.

A good estate plan can help you minimize your tax burden. Specifically, estate planning can impact (1) income taxes, (2) inheritance taxes, and (3) estate taxes.

Most people are familiar with income taxes. However, they are less familiar with estate taxes; and many people have no idea that inheritance taxes even exist. So it comes as no surprise that one of the most common questions I get from prospective clients is:

"Do I need to pay inheritance taxes?"

It is a good question and is usually accompanied by a number of other, related questions:

  • What, exactly, is an inheritance tax?

  • Is an inheritance tax the same thing as an estate tax?

  • How can I avoid having to pay an inheritance tax?

This blog post will answer these questions, give you a better understanding of the difference between inheritance taxes and estate taxes, and explain how those laws operate in Oklahoma.

The Ultimate Guide to Lawsuit-Proofing Your Estate Plan

The Ultimate Guide to Lawsuit-Proofing Your Estate Plan

Here's a scary question:

Does your estate plan actually protect your estate?

You spent all that time and money to make sure that your estate will be protected from taxes, from probate, and from creditors — but you may have forgotten one major thing:

You forgot to protect your estate from your heirs.

The sad truth is that children and other heirs often fight over the estate of a deceased loved one, even if the decedent left a valid estate plan. And fighting often means lawsuits.

Heirs can contest an estate plan for a number of reasons: jealousy, greed, sibling rivalries or disagreements. Regardless of why a lawsuit is filed, it means trouble for everyone involved.

Estate Planning in the Digital Age

Estate Planning in the Digital Age

Who gets your Facebook account when you die? What happens to your Twitter? Your Instagram? Your e-mail account? Your Bitcoin? The Digital Age and the advent of Internet- and cloud-based assets have created a new category of estate planning.

Your Internet accounts are your property, and property stored online that has any value requires the same level of protection you give to other tangible (e.g., houses, cars, stocks) and intangible (e.g., patents, copyrights, goodwill) assets.

You Have More Digital Assets Than You Think

Cutting-edge technology continues to evolve at a rapid pace while estate planning and probate laws struggle to keep up. As a result, some companies responsible for managing the platforms for digital assets have sought to fill the void.